The University of the Third Age (DLDK)

Future Events Programme
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Mar

09

11:00

Music Group Programme - The Verdi and Mozart Requiems

Elizabeth Csibi

  • 📅Tuesday, March 9, 2021
  • 🕥11:00 - 12:15
  • 🏟ZOOM meeting (map)

Following her musical studies at the Royal Irish Academy of Music and the College of Music Dublin and in London with the renowned teacher Jaroslav Vanecek, Elizabeth has enjoyed a long and active performing career. She was a member of the RTE Symphony Orchestra, the Irish Chamber Orchestra, the Orchestra of St. Cecilia, the 20th Century ensemble Concorde and toured the USA, Russia, China and Europe, performing in many prestigious venues. Elizabeth joined the String Faculty of the Royal Irish Academy of Music in 1989 and was appointed to the newly created position of Head of String Faculty in 1995 and in 2010 Elizabeth was awarded a Fellowship Honoris Causa from the Royal Irish Academy of Music for her services to music in Ireland.

The Verdi and Mozart Requiems are arguably the best and most popular of all Requiems, both magnificently powerful and serenely sensitive, yet each totally different in approach and effect. From the whispering cellos opening of the Verdi Requiem, through the terrifying rage of the Dies Irae, followed by the dramatic trumpet call to judgement in the Tuba Mirum, the music is a physical experience that batters the senses and throws the listener through a powerful emotional tornado. It catches the drama of Aida, the tragic pathos of La Traviata and the beauty of his operatic arias, none more sensitive than his final Libera Me. Mozart's Requiem on the other hand creates a different pathway to our emotions with music that is sublimely elegant and graceful with exquisite intensity. There is a mysterious and darker feel to the texture which expresses heartfelt grief and despair while the delicate sensitivity of the Hostias enfolds the listener like a warm comforting hug. Join us on Tuesday March 9th to explore and experience this glorious music.


Mar

16

11:00

Seizo Sugawara, Eileen Gray’s enduring collaborator

Ruth Starr

  • 📅Tuesday, March 16, 2021
  • 🕥11:00 - 12:00
  • 🏟ZOOM meeting (map)

This presentation will consider the influence of the Japanese sculptor and lacquer specialist, Seizo Sugawara (1884 – 1937) on Eileen Gray (1878 – 1976) in the context of the pervasiveness of Japonisme. Gray is best known for her pioneering work in early modernist architecture. Less well known is her acclaimed earlier career as a lacquer furniture designer. The presentation reveals Gray’s fine appreciation of the unique characteristics of Japanese lacquer.

Ruth Starr is a historian of Japanese art (including Japanese crafts) from the earliest times to the 20th century. Starr’s current research seeks to untangle the web of connections linking Japanese art and European art, following the common thread of lacquerware. Her major interest is how these links were manifest in Ireland during the Japonisme movement of the late 19th Century, particularly the Japanese influence on Eileen Gray, (1878- 1976); also Japonisme in 19th and 20th century Ireland and lacquerware in Japan and Europe.


Mar

30

11:00

The Radio Universe from Birr Castle

Dr. Peter Gallagher

  • 📅Tuesday, March 30, 2021
  • 🕥11:00 - 12:00
  • 🏟ZOOM meeting (map)

Professor Gallagher is the newly appointed Head of the Astronomy and Astrophysics section of the Dublin Institute of Advanced Studies and is the driving force behind the installation and operation of the new Radio Telescope at Birr Castle in Co. Offaly.

Birr Castle is an appropriate location because an optical telescope was set up there in the 1840s and it remained the largest telescope in the world for over 70 years.

The Radio telescope is the latest addition to a European wide network of such telescopes that are electronically linked so that the overall sensitivity and resolution are far larger than that of one of them alone. These characteristics make possible a wide range of research projects from studies of our sun to the nature of the early universe.





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