The University of the Third Age (DLDK)


Future Events Programme

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Feb

01

11:00

The O'Donnells of Tyrconnell - Dynasty, Lineages & their Monuments

Francis M. O'Donnell

  • 📅Tuesday, February 1, 2022
  • 🕥11:00 - 12:00
  • 🏟ZOOM meeting (map)

The talk will be based on his book, "The O'Donnells of Tyrconnell - a Hidden Legacy", and its re-discovery of lost lineages, their heritage, and the quandaries of survival at home and in exile. The treatment will expand beyond the familiar tales of Red Hugh O'Donnell, the Spanish Armada, the Siege of Kinsale, the Flight of the Earls, and the Plantations that led to further exiles. It will address the question how they fared abroad especially in Habsburg lands at the time, Flanders, Austria and Spain, and in France before and after the Revolution. The French connection will be detailed in covering the principal characters, their roles and fate. The relics of the various branches, and the legacy they left will be touched upon, concluding with some reflections and updates on the search for Red Hugh's remains.

Francis M. O’Donnell, born in Dublin in 1954, graduated in Economics and Philosophy from the National University of Ireland in 1975 and later read International Law and Diplomacy in Geneva. The Irish-Arab Society, proposed by him in 1968, played a key role in promoting trade, cultural, and diplomatic links with twelve countries in the Middle East and North Africa in the early 1970s. Joining the United Nations in 1976, he spent twelve years in African development. Later, from Geneva, he pioneered rapid deployment of UN volunteer expertise to forty war-torn countries across the globe. In the 1990s, he managed support to post-conflict countries and promoted economic and governance reforms. He retired from the UN after thirty-two years of service, latterly as senior UN representative in Yugoslavia/Serbia-Montenegro (2000-2004) and Ukraine (2004-2009). From 2009 to 2013, he was Ambassador of the Sovereign Order of Malta to the Slovak Republic. Until recently he served as chairman of an residential owners company and continues as an advisor to think-tanks and advocacy groups. He continues to participate in or moderate policy panels mainly of current/former presidents, prime ministers, and other international leaders around Europe. He is also a trustee/director of the School of Civic Education, formerly the Moscow School of Political Studies, now de-camped and registered in London. He has published in scholarly journals and is the recipient of several national and international awards.


Feb

15

11:00

Dunsink Observatory

Professor Peter Gallagher

  • 📅Tuesday, February 15, 2022
  • 🕥11:00 - 12:00

Professor Peter Gallagher, Director of DIAS Dunsink Observatory, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies.

Dunsink Observatory was founded in 1785 by Trinity College Dublin following a bequest from Provost Francis Andrews. In the 19th and 20th centuries, its facilities were used to measure the distances to nearby stars, and more practically, to set Dublin Mean Time. Among its famous directors was Sir William Rowan Hamilton, who was appointed Royal Astronomer of Ireland at Dunsink at the age of 21, and it was at the Observatory that he undertook his ground-breaking work on optics, mechanics and algebra. Dunsink was transferred to DIAS in 1947, and for the past 75 years has been used as a location for astronomical research and public engagement. In this talk, I will describe the history of the observatory, some of its resident astronomers, and talk about future plans for the observatory.

Professor Peter Gallagher is Head of Astrophysics at the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies (DIAS) and an Adjunct Professor in physics at Trinity College Dublin. His research is primarily concerned with understanding solar storms and their impact on Earth. He has a long association with ESA and NASA and leads the Irish LOFAR radio telescope project at Birr Castle. Peter received a BSc in Physics and Mathematics from university College Dublin in 1995, followed by an MSc in Optoelectronics and a PhD in Solar Physics from Queen's University Belfast in 1999. He then spent 6 years in the US, firstly as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Owens Valley Solar Array and Big Bear Solar Observatory in California, then as an Instrument Scientist at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Following 13 years undertaking research and teaching in Physics and Astrophysics at Trinity College Dublin, he was appointed Head of Astrophysics and Director of Dunsink Observatory at DIAS.


Mar

01

11:00

Walking Cheerfully over the World : Quakerism in Ireland.

John McCormick

  • 📅Tuesday, March 1, 2022
  • 🕥11:00 - 12:00

John McCormick (b.1938) : Having studied French at TCD John went on to write a PhD thesis on the French theatre director Gaston Baty. He lectured for three years at the Abo Akademi (Finland) and five at the University of Glasgow before returning in 1970 to TCD to teach French. In 1984 John transferred to head the newly established drama department at TCD. He has published several books on nineteenth century French and British theatre, and since the 1990s has become internationally recognized as a historian of European puppet theatre. Working as a volunteer at the Friends' Historical Library Dublin, he has edited the accounts of Arthur and Gorgon Pearson of their work with the Friends' Ambulance Unit in two World Wars and, more recently, Clodagh Grubb's book "Samplers Sewing and Simplicity in Quaker Ireland".


Mar

15

11:00

All about Confidence

Professor Ian Robertson

  • 📅Tuesday, March 15, 2022
  • 🕥11:00 - 12:00

Probing the science and neuroscience behind confidence that has emerged over the last decade, Professor Ian Robertson outlines the evidence gathered in his best-selling book "How confidence works" (Penguin, 2021). He explains how confidence plays out in our minds, our brains and indeed our bodies. He explains where it comes from and how it spreads. Confidence is critical when we are young, with compound interest-type effects on achievement, but it is also critical in the third age when negative aging stereotypes can eat away at it and undermine our capacities.

Professor Ian Robertson is Co-director of the Global Brain Health Institute (www.gbhi.org) and a Member of Academia Europaea. A trained clinical psychologist as well as a neuroscientist, he is widely known internationally for his research on attention and the human brain. His popular writing has included five books aimed at the general reader : Mind Sculpture (2000), Mind's Eye (2003), Stay Sharp (2005), The Winner Effect (2012), and The Stress Test (2016), all of which have been widely translated. His most recent book is How Confidence Works (2021).


Mar

29

11:00

Elizabeth I and the perils of female monarchy in the sixteenth century

Prof Ciaran Brady

  • 📅Tuesday, March 29, 2022
  • 🕥11:00 - 12:00
  • 🏟ZOOM meeting (map)

Ciaran Brady was formerly Professor of Early Modern History and Historiography, and is now Fellow Emeritus, at Trinity College Dublin. Originally a specialist in sixteenth century Irish and English history, he developed a second interest in the theory and practice of historical thinking and writing, and has published widely in both areas. Joint editor of the peer review journal Irish Historical Studies for ten years, he has been President of the Historical Society and the Historical Association of Ireland. A founder member of the Trinity Access Programme, he was deeply involved in the construction and development of the new Leaving Certificate History syllabus by the National Council of Curriculum and Development. He is a member of the Royal Irish Academy.

The present talk, ‘Elizabeth I and the perils of female monarchy in the sixteenth century’ is a reflection of his dual interests [in sixteenth century English and Irish history and in historiography]. Taking a critical look at the several ways in which Elizabeth has been interpreted and judged by generations of historians, he will seek to identify, on the basis of verifiable evidence, the key values and priorities by which Elizabeth herself and her contemporaries judged her actions and attitudes. An attempt will be made to assess the degree to which Elizabeth succeeded in overcoming the many obstacles confronting her as an unmarried female monarch, and also the degree to which she fell short.