The University of the Third Age (DLDK)

Future Events Programme
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Sep

01

11:00

Notre Dame de Paris: Triumph & Disaster

Professor Roger Stalley (Emeritus,TCD)

  • 📅Tuesday, September 1, 2020
  • 🕥11:00 - 12:00
  • 🏟ZOOM meeting (map)

Roger Stalley is fellow emeritus of Trinity College Dublin where he was Professor of the History of Art until his retirement in 2010. He has published numerous books on various aspects of medieval art and architecture, and over one hundred peer reviewed papers, his most recent work being Early Irish Sculpture and the Art of the high crosses (Mellon / Yale 2020). The French Gothic Cathedrals formed one of his most popular undergraduate courses and former students have fond memories of the accompanying study visits he led to France.

Resumé

On April 15th last year the whole world was able to watch in aghast as flames spread irresistibly from one end of Notre Dame to the other. The airwaves were filled with outbursts of despair and calamity, but in fact the the cathedral itself remained largely intact. What looked like a complete disaster on our TV screens was in fact a triumph for Gothic – in particular a triumph for the Gothic system of design.

Fire was an ever present fear in the middle ages: once a fire had taken hold in large buildings there was not much anyone could do about it. By the thirteenth century builders had learned to manage the problem through the use of the ribbed vault - the stone vaults or ceilings found in major French churches (though not always in English and Irish works). As buildings became ever taller, supporting these vaults at a high level became increasingly problematical. Notre Dame was the first French cathedral to attain an interior height of 100 feet and it was one of the first to employ flying buttresses to stabilise the structure. When started in 1163 it was a hugely ambitious project. As building progressed the design was both modified and enhanced, in particular thanks to the introduction of bar tracery, the delicate stone patterns found in the windows.

In his talk Professor Stalley will discuss the impact of fires in the middle ages and explain the unique place that Notre Dame enjoys in the history of Gothic architecture. He will also consider the nature of the damage caused by the fire and the many problems that confront the restorers.


Sep

15

11:00

Racism; an enduring evil

Dr.Gavan Titley (U.C.Maynooth)

  • 📅Tuesday, September 15, 2020
  • 🕥11:00 - 12:00
  • 🏟ZOOM meeting (map)


Sep

29

11:00

A U3A Quiz

Raymond Burke

  • 📅Tuesday, September 29, 2020
  • 🕥11:00 - 12:00
  • 🏟ZOOM meeting (map)


Oct

13

11:00

‘Elevating the honour of the screen from its degraded depths’: Religious Cinema of the 1950's

Dr.Sarah Culhane

  • 📅Tuesday, October 13, 2020
  • 🕥11:00 - 12:00
  • 🏟ZOOM meeting (map)

This talk draws on archival materials and oral histories gathered as part of the Irish Cinema Audiences project. Launched in June 2018, Irish Cinema Audiences is a collaborative project run in conjunction with Age Action Ireland and its network of lifelong learning groups.

Using a combination of questionnaires and video-interviews, the aim of this project is to investigate the social and cultural role that cinema played in the everyday lives of Irish audiences of the 1950s. Memories of religious films are frequent among cinema-goers of the 1950s who often recall Hollywood epics such as The Robe (Henry Coster, 1953) and The Ten Commandments (Cecil B. De Mille, 1956) or dramas like The Song of Bernadette (Henry King, 1943) and The Nun’s Story (Fred Zinneman, 1959), which dealt explicitly with religious content.

While Hollywood cinema of the 1950s is associated with a significant number of religious or quasi-religious films, the religious film was also a feature of film production in other national contexts. Jorge Perez (2017) notes that in Spain national film production was marked by a ‘religious cycle’ throughout the 1930s, ’40s and ’50s. Owing to its extensive international distribution, the 1955 film Marcellino, pan y vino (Miracle of Marcelino) is perhaps the most prolific example of the religious cycle films produced at that time.

For interviewees of the Irish Cinema Audiences project, the film is often associated with school trips to the cinema or screenings in boarding school. Through analysis of oral history testimony and press discourse, I will explore how a series of European religious films were promoted and received by Irish audiences.

Sarah Culhane is a CAROLINE Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow in Media Studies at Maynooth University. In collaboration with Age Action Ireland her current research project, ‘Irish Cinema Audiences: Engaging older audiences and sustaining Ireland’s cultural heritage’, investigates the significance of cinema-going and film in the everyday lives of Irish people in the 1950s. She holds a PhD in Italian studies from the University of Bristol. Her PhD research was conducted as part of the Italian Cinema Audiences project (AHRC 2013-2016) and is featured in Italian Cinema Audiences: Histories, Memories of Cinema-going in Post-war Italy (Bloomsbury, 2020).


Oct

27

11:00

" The Devil's Champion": the life and times of Charles Darwin

Dr.Peter Boyle

  • 📅Tuesday, October 27, 2020
  • 🕥11:00 - 12:00
  • 🏟ZOOM meeting (map)


Nov

10

11:00

" My Grandmother:An Irish Red Cross Pioneer"

AGM & VIP Guest Speaker Roland Evans

  • 📅Tuesday, November 10, 2020
  • 🕥11:00 - 12:00
  • 🏟ZOOM meeting (map)


Nov

24

11:00

Our End Year Concert

Pere Noel

  • 📅Tuesday, November 24, 2020
  • 🕥11:00 - 12:00
  • 🏟ZOOM meeting (map)





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